PROGRAM 

MONDAY 28 NOVEMBER 2005 (FIRST FLOOR HALL, IN FRONT OF THE MULTIPLE USE ROOM)

 

18:00-20:00            Registration, Ice Break, and Exhibitions’ Opening

 

TUESDAY 29 NOVEMBER 2005 (MULTIPLE USE ROOM)

 

7:00-9:00                Registration

9:00-9:30             Opening Ceremony

 

9:30-10:30           Keynote “Interoperability among Geospatial Ontologies” by Jerry Hobbs, ISI, USA

10:30-11:00            Coffee Break

 

11:00-12:45         Session 1 (Theories for Geospatial Semantic Information: Chair – M. Egenhofer)

11:00-11:30            Comparing Representations of Geographic Knowledge Expressed as Conceptual Graphs

Athanasios Karalopoulos, Margarita Kokla, and Marinos Kavouras (Greece)

11:30-12:00            Ontology Ontegeny: Understanding how an Ontology is Created and Developed

Hayley Mizen, Catherine Dolbear, and Glen Hart (United Kingdom)

12:00-12:30            Representing the Meaning of Spatial Behavior by Spatially Grounded Intentional Systems

Christoph Schlieder (Germany)

12:30-12:45            An Interstage Change Model for Sandbox Geography

Florian A. Twaroch (Austria)

 

12:45-15:00         Lunch

 

15:00-17:00         Session 4 (Ontology-based Spatial Information Retrieval: Chair – I. Cruz)

15:00-15:15            Purpose-Driven Navigation

Neeharika Adabala and Kentaro Toyama (India)

15:15-15:45            Extending Semantic Similarity Measurement with Thematic Roles

Krzysztof Janowicz (Germany)

15:45-16:00            Coffee Break

16:00-16:30            Exploiting Geospatial Markers to Explore and Resocialize Localized Documents Christophe Marquesuzaa, Patrick Etcheverry, and Julien Lesbegueries (France)

16:30-17:00            Ontology Matching for Spatial Data Retrieval from Internet Portals

Hartwig H. Hochmair (United States)

 

19:00                     Banquet

 

WEDNESDAY 30 NOVEMBER 2005 (MULTIPLE USE ROOM)

 

9:00-11:00           Session 2 (Formal Representations for Geospatial Data: Chair – S. Levashkin)

9:00-9:15                Ontology-Driven Description of Spatial Data for Their Semantic Processing

Miguel Torres, Rolando Quintero, Marco Moreno, and Frederico Fonseca (Mexico and United States)

9:15-9:45                Processes and Events in Dynamic Geo-Networks

Antony Galton and Michael Worboys (United Kingdom and United States)

9:45-10:00              Coffee Break

10:00-10:30            A Qualitative Trajectory Calculus and the Composition of its Relations

Nico Van de Weghe, Bart Kuijpers, Peter Bogaert, and Philippe De Maeyer (Belgium)

10:30-11:00            Modeling Noteworthy Events in a Geospatial Domain

Stephen Cole and Kathleen Hornsby (United States)

 

11:00-12:30         Session 3 (Similarity Comparison of Spatial Datasets: Chair – A. Rodriguez)

11:00-11:30            Measuring Semantic Similarity between Geospatial Conceptual Regions

Angela Schwering and Martin Raubal (Germany)

11:30-12:00            Using Semantic Similarity Metrics to Uncover Category and Land Cover Change

Ola Ahlqvist (United States)

12:00-12:30            Measuring Arrangement Similarity between Thematic Raster Databases Using a QuadTree-Based Approach

Denis J. Dean (United States)

 

12:30-14:30         Lunch

 

14:30-16:30         Session 5 (Geospatial Semantic Web: Chair – J. Hobbs)

14:30-14:45            Mobile GIS: Attribute Data Presentation under Time and Space Constraints

Lasse Møller-Jensen (Denmark)

14:45-15:15            Geospatial Semantic Web: Architecture of Ontologies

Dave Kolas, John Hebeler, and Mike Dean (United States)

15:15-15:30            Coffee Break

15:30-16:00            Formal Approach to Reconciliation of Individual Ontologies for Personalisation of Geospatial Semantic Web

Pragya Agarwal, Yongjian Huang, and Vania Dimitrova (United Kingdom)

16:00-16:30            Incorporating Update Semantics within Geographical Ontologies

Xuan Gu and Dr Richard T. Pascoe (New Zealand)

 

FIRST FLOOR HALL (IN FRONT OF THE MULTIPLE USE ROOM)

 

17:00-19:00         Poster Session and Industrial Exhibitions by Michael Baker and GTT NetCorp. (Coordinator – M. Torres)

                              

Semantic Problem Definition in Ambiguously Defined Agricultural Data

Kathleen M. Baker (United States)

                               

Towards a Methodolgy for Domain Expert Development of Geo-ontologies

Fiona Hemsley-Flint (United Kingdom)

 

HBR-tree: An Efficient Location Indexing Method for Moving Objects

Dong-O Kim, Dong-Suk Hong, Ki-Joon Han, Jae-Kwan Yun (Korea)

 

                               Semantic Topological Descriptor for Topographic Maps

Miguel Martínez (Mexico)

 

Semantics of Proximity in Locative Expressions

Félix Mata (Mexico)


Template-based Geospatial Knowledge Representation

Víctor Montes de Oca (Mexico)

Conceptualization of Geometrical Aspects of Geospatial Data

Karina Verástegui (Mexico)

 

                               Geospatial Semantic Web for Searching

                               Nancy Wiegand (United States)

 

 

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

 

 

TIME

MONDAY 28

TIME

TUESDAY 29

TIME

WEDNESDAY 30

18:00-20:00

Registration, Ice Break, and Exhibitions’ Opening

7:00-9:00

Registration

 

 

 

 

9:00-9:30

Opening Ceremony

9:00-11:00

Session 2 (Formal Representations for Geospatial Data: Chair – S. Levashkin)

 

 

9:30-10:30

Keynote (J. Hobbs)

 

 

 

 

11:00-12:45

Session 1 (Theories for Geospatial Semantic Information: Chair – M. Egenhofer)

11:00-12:30

Session 3 (Similarity Comparison of Spatial Datasets: Chair – A. Rodriguez)

 

 

15:00-17:00

Session 4 (Ontology-based Spatial Information Retrieval: Chair – I. Cruz)

14:30-16:30

 

Session 5 (Geospatial Semantic Web: Chair – J. Hobbs)

 

 

17:00-19:00

 

Poster Session and Industrial Exhibitions by Michael Baker and GTT NetCorp.

 

 

10:30-11:00

15:45-16:00

Coffee Breaks

9:45-10:00

15:15-15:30

Coffee Breaks

 

 

12:45-15:00

Lunch

12:30-14:30

Lunch

 

 

19:00

Banquet

 

 

 

 

KEYNOTE

 

INTEROPERABILITY AMONG GEOSPATIAL ONTOLOGIES

Jerry R. Hobbs

USC Information Sciences Institute
Marina del Rey, CA 90292, USA

ABSTRACT. One way to achieve interoperability among diverse resources in any domain is to construct an "inter-theory" into and out of which the basic constructs of each resource can be translated. One can, for example, translate a query formulated in the framework of resource A into the inter-theory, translate that into the language of resource B to exploit its special strengths in answering the query, and translate the answer back into the language of resource A.

Because the perspectives of various resources can be very different, the inter-theory should be a careful, broad explication of the basic concepts of the domain making as few theory-laden commitments as possible and isolating those it needs to make. At the same time, it should focus primarily on the basic concepts, leaving treatment of more specialized areas to individual resources. For example, an ontology for geospatial interoperability should interface with a resource on the shapes of geographical regions, but not encode its internal representations.

In this talk I will describe a fledgling effort to develop a common ontology for expressing and reasoning about spatial information for the Semantic Web, that was begun as part of the DARPA Agent Markup Language (DAML) program. The aim of this ontology is to provide a way for different spatial reasoning engines and spatial resources to communicate with each other, as well as a way for people to mark up the spatial information on their web sites. The goals of the effort are to produce an ontology that will

1. Enable general, though not necessarily efficient, reasoning about spatial concepts.

2. Link with more efficient specialized reasoning engines for spatial reasoning.

3. Link with the numerous databases that exist containing a wealth of specific, e.g., geographical, spatial information.

4. Support convenient query capabilities for spatial information.

The classes of concepts that should be covered in such an ontology include topological relations (e.g., RCC8), dimension, orientation, shape, measures like length, area and volume, latitude, longitude and elevation, and abstract notions of political subdivision. I will focus in particular on topological relations. In addition, the inter-theory should be amenable to treatments of uncertainty and granularity. For example, concerning the latter, we can view a city as a 0-dimensional point, a 2-dimensional region, and a 3-dimensional volume, and these need to be compatible viewpoints within the inter-theory.

I will also draw lessons from two more mature efforts to construct inter-theories in the domains of time and of the structure of events and processes.

SPEAKER'S BIO. Dr. Jerry R. Hobbs is a prominent researcher in the fields of computational linguistics, discourse analysis, and artificial intelligence. He earned his doctor's degree from New York University in 1974 in computer science. He has taught at Yale University and the City University of New York. From 1977 to 2002 he was with the Artificial Intelligence Center at SRI International, Menlo Park, California, where he was a principal scientist and program director of the Natural Language Program. He has written numerous papers in the areas of parsing, syntax, semantic interpretation, information extraction, knowledge representation, encoding commonsense knowledge, discourse analysis, the structure of conversation, and the Semantic Web. He is the author of the book "Literature and Cognition", and was also editor of the book "Formal Theories of the Commonsense World". He led SRI's text-understanding research, and directed the development of the abduction-based TACITUS system for text understanding, and the FASTUS system for rapid extraction of information from text based on finite-state automata. The latter system constituted the basis for an SRI spinoff, Discern Communications. In September 2002 he took a position as senior computer scientist and research professor at the Information Sciences Institute, University of Southern California. He has been a consulting professor with the Linguistics Department and the Symbolic Systems Program at Stanford University. He has served as general editor of the Ablex Series on Artificial Intelligence. He is a past president of the Association for Computational Linguistics, and is a Fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence. In January 2003 he was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Philosophy from the University of Uppsala, Sweden.

Conference Proceedings is now available online LNCS 3799 GeoSpatial Semantics: First International Conference, GeoS 2005, Mexico City, Mexico, November 29-30, 2005. Editors: M. Andrea Rodríguez, Isabel F. Cruz, Sergei Levashkin, Max J. Egenhofer


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